The best British Summer since the 1970’s: we love the sun! Does the sun love your hearing aids!?

The best British Summer since the 1970’s: we love the sun! Does the sun love your hearing aids!?

In the last 4 weeks, we have been lucky enough to experience the best British Summer since the 1970’s. We have seen temperatures soar past 30 degrees and have barely had a spot of rain (the poor grass!). Every evening there is the beautiful smell of barbecue’s floating over the fence and everyone you meet generally seems happier so personally we never want it to end! As ever, we have a little bit of advice for you to help you deal with this gorgeous British Summer in the best possible way for your hearing / hearing aids. Noisy events Always protect your hearing at noisy events, such as festivals, by using ear plugs / muffs. You really don’t want to condemn yourself to suffering with tinnitus because it’s not nice. Lawnmowers, leaf blowers and hedge trimmers can also reach the dizzy heights of 100 decibels so be sure to protect your ears when using these. Hearing aid care In terms of looking after your hearing aids, our top end hearing aids are already moisture, dust, sweat and water resistant (to a degree) but it’s probably not advisable to test this! With the likes of the WaterResistant feature in Phonak and and HydraShield in Starkey, you can have some peace of mind with your aids. If you want your aids to be kept in good working order and not stuck in repair, take heed of our advice to enjoy this fabulous British Summer. Storage Always store your aids in a cool, dry place as condensation, sweat, moisture and dust make your hearing aids unhappy. The best way to make sure...
Noisy restaurants and supermarkets; do you struggle to hear the conversation over background music?

Noisy restaurants and supermarkets; do you struggle to hear the conversation over background music?

We’ve all sat down to eat in a noisy restaurant. Charities, Pipe Down and Action on Hearing Loss, have teamed up to try and get rid of background music in restaurants. There are millions of people in the UK with hearing loss and to bring the point home, their research shows that 90% of those with hearing loss feel that background noise is their biggest bugbear. Background music / noise makes it difficult to hear what is being said for those with hearing loss. Hearing aids are designed to help with this. Unfortunately, there seems to be a trend towards playing music in restaurants. This often means those with hearing loss are less likely to venture out. Gorka Duhri from Action on Hearing Loss told The Times “For some people, it can be irritating. But when it leads to you getting the wrong order or not being able to have a conversation and you’re missing the main bit of the joke because you just can’t hear it, you feel left out. Background music makes it harder to pick up a particular voice. We would ask [restaurants] not to play any.” From supermarkets to restaurants Marks and Spencers decided to remove all music form their stores 10 years after introducing them. This was partly because of charities trying to make going out a more pleasant experience for those with hearing loss. “We’re focused on putting the customer at the heart of everything we do. This decision is the result of extensive research and feedback from our customers and colleagues” M&S said. The hope is that one day music played in stores...
Formula 1 British Grand Prix Weekend; how loud will it get?

Formula 1 British Grand Prix Weekend; how loud will it get?

The world of Formula 1 is descending on Silverstone this weekend as we say hello to the British Grand Prix! If you are lucky enough to have tickets, we hope you have a fabulous time and remember to stay safe in the sun. F1 just might be the noisiest sport there is so you need to think about more than just sun protection. Just how loud is a Formula 1 car? In 2013, Craig Dolder, an Acoustical Engineer from the University of Texas decided to find out. Dolder took his sound measuring equipment to Montreal’s Gilles-Villeneuve track. Of course just how loud the race can get for an audience member is entirely dependent on where they’re sitting. Not just on whether you’re sitting closer to the track or further away, but also at what point on the track. Dolder told livescience “There’s certainly likely to be louder positions in the audience and quieter positions than those I mentioned”. He found that the noise was lowest at the start of an ‘S’ turn when drivers slow down but loudest just after a hairpin turn before drivers floor it for the straight. On why he wanted to find out, Dolder did some research online to find out what sort of protection he should wear after deciding he wanted to attend a racing event. He told The Telegraph “So I made the arrangements, and then I thought to myself, this is going to be really loud. What do I need to wear to protect myself?”. Asking F1 fans themselves on online forums, he got all sorts of advice including earplugs, earmuffs and...
Exposure to loud noises; how to combat the symptoms

Exposure to loud noises; how to combat the symptoms

We’ve all experienced that annoying ringing in our ears after long exposure to loud noises. An example would be attending a concert with no ear protection; this could damage the delicate structures within your ear. This is what causes the ringing in your ear, often described as tinnitus.   What is tinnitus? Loud noises can damage tiny hair cells in the inner ear. These hair cells vibrate in response to noise and send a message to the brain. If these are destroyed, they do not grow back. Scientists think that damage to these cells causes the brain to misinterpret the signal it receives, so it makes up a sound instead. This is why you hear a ringing in your ear after a concert, even if the room is silent. Generally these symptoms will only last a few hours. However, if you listen to live music regularly, you may experience tinnitus for extended periods. If this is the case, you should seek treatment.   Loud noises The most effective way to avoid tinnitus is to reduce your exposure to loud noises. Even just talking more quietly can be beneficial if you’re suffering. Avoiding loud bars and events would be a good idea as well as watching the TV at a lower volume.   Soft noise can help Often you only notice the ringing when there are no other sounds to compete with it. You can help this by listening to soft music. Medication and yoga are also a good way to remove the focus from the ringing in your ear. These techniques are known for reducing stress. If the ringing...
Netflix; the great subtitles debate

Netflix; the great subtitles debate

Times have changed with regards to watching television. We no longer need to settle down on the sofa to watch our favourite programme as it airs. We can hit that fabulous red record button or even easier we can use a catch up or streaming service. Perhaps the most infamous of the streaming services is Netflix. Recent reports show that almost 2 million people in the UK are signed up to the service and let’s not forget that there can be lots of users for each account. Netflix subtitles row This week, the BBC reports that Netflix are having a lot of issues with their subtitle service. This means that Netflix’s deaf and hard of hearing customers are seriously missing out on all their favourite programmes. The main focus of the complaints have been around the makeover show, Queer Eye. Deaf Netflix fan, Rogan Shannon, has expressed his irritation on Twitter and demanded that Netflix explain why they are not captioning word for word. His tweets have been retweeted thousands of times by fellow Netflix fans. The tweets also claim that the subtitles censor profanity and edit dialogue for brevity. Other Netflix users have accused the service of failing to caption foreign language inserts and correcting distinct dialogues into Standard English. After the huge surge in social media complaints, Netflix thanked it’s fans for raising concerns and said that it was looking at fixing the issues raised. Subtitles Subtitles are created in different ways depending on the broadcaster. A lot of broadcasters employ outside subtitling firms. The subtitles can be written manually and time-coded to audio or are generated...
Earwax removal; why we think microsuction is best

Earwax removal; why we think microsuction is best

Earwax removal can be a pretty scary thing when it’s your first time. However, most people don’t realise that it’s very common. It’s so common in fact, that it’s the most likely reason for temporary hearing loss. No need to be embarrassed as you’re not the only one having problems with earwax. It’s natural for there to be a build up from time to time. Below are the two types of earwax removal you will come across with the advantages and disadvantages as well as how to protect your ears. Microsuction Microsuction is a newer form of earwax removal and the preferred option. Not only do you not need to soften the wax using olive oil or ear drops in most cases, it doesn’t leave the ear waterlogged after the procedure. In addition, it is less likely to cause an ear infection as can happen sometimes with irrigation. Microsuction earwax removal works by placing what might as well be a vacuum cleaner into the ear. This then sucks the earwax out. Some clinics have a camera on the end of the microsuction device with a television screen so you can see the earwax as it’s being removed. At Veritas, we have over 14 years of experience with microsuction wax removal. Irrigation This is the form of wax removal you are more likely to come across at your GP surgery. Irrigation involves pumping water into the ear and holding a pan on the neck of the patient for the wax to flush out. The downside to irrigation is that you usually have to spend a couple of weeks softening the wax...

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