There are some things you can do to prevent the onset of hearing loss!

There are some things you can do to prevent the onset of hearing loss!

Unfortunately, hearing loss is not something that can always be prevented. Sometimes as you get older, your hearing will just naturally deteriorate. There are a few things you can do to protect your hearing. Exposure to loud noises is often a factor in hearing loss. Avoid loud noises Whilst not always practical, you should keep away from loud noise as much as you can. A noise is probably loud enough to cause damage if you have to raise your voice to talk to other people. Another sign is if your ears are hurting from the noise. If you have a ringing in your ears after, it was probably too loud. Be careful listening to music I hate to be the bearer of bad news but listening to loud music through earphones / headphones is a big danger to your hearing. You can try using noise cancelling headphones which will block out the outside noise. You should only have the volume up to a level where you can hear the music comfortably. Generally you shouldn’t listen to music at any more than 60% of the maximum volume. You should take a 5 minute break from your ear/headphones each hour to give your ears a rest. Take care during loud events & at work A loud event / activity such as going to a nightclub, gig or sporting event can be damaging to your hearing. Always try to move away from the source of loud noise, generally the loudspeakers. Try to take a break from the noise every 15 minutes. You could also consider wearing earplugs. If you are exposed to loud noises at work,...
New drug to tackle the root cause of hearing loss

New drug to tackle the root cause of hearing loss

Currently 1 in 6 people in the UK suffer with hearing loss. There is no cure for hearing loss and no drugs that are able to treat it. Patients either opt for hearing aids or cochlear implants which whilst working fantastically, don’t tackle the root cause of the hearing loss. Sensorineural Hearing Loss Damage to the sensory hair cells in the cochlear is known as sensorineural hearing loss and is a major cause of hearing loss in later life. Previously, hair cell loss was thought to be irreversible but studies in animals now indicate that inner ear sensory hair cells could be regenerated. This happens using a small molecule substance called gamma-secretase inhibitor. New Trial Researchers in London are now leading a trial to test a drug in patients with hearing loss based on these previous animal studies. Patients are eligible if they are aged 18-80 years; have lived with the symptoms of hearing loss for less than 20 years; have bilateral, symmetrical hearing loss; and use hearing aids or have been previously offered hearing aids. Phase 1 of this trial took place throughout 2018 and injections were given to 15 patients in their ear. These patients had mild to moderate sensory hearing loss so as to test the safety and tolerability of the drug. Stage 2 Now it is time to move on to the next stage of the trial which will test the efficacy of the drug in 40 adults who have mild to moderate adult-onset sensorineural hearing loss. These 40 patients will receive 3 injections into their inner ear, through the eardrum. Professor Shakeel Saeed, Professor...
How much do you know about Meniere’s Disease?

How much do you know about Meniere’s Disease?

Meniere’s Disease is a health condition that affects the inner ear. It is thought that roughly 1 in 1000 people in the UK suffer from the disease. The disease is more prominent in adults between 20-60 and slightly more common in women than men. Meniere’s Disease is a progressive condition that impacts hearing and balance. Often this results in bouts of vertigo, tinnitus, hearing impairment and pressure build-up in the ear. Symptoms & diagnosis The increased pressure created in the ear by Meniere’s Disease means those living with the condition can experience episodes of dizziness, vomiting and impaired hearing. Episodes usually last a few hours but can take days to fully recover from and return to normal health. The severity of each symptom and how often you experience problems varies from person to person. For some, vertigo, dizziness and vomiting may be the main symptoms. Whereas for others, the impairment of hearing can be the main symptom. If you think you may suffer from Meniere’s Disease, the most important first step is to contact your GP and get a medical diagnosis. Many of the symptoms can be caused by other illnesses and conditions, so getting a trusted diagnosis is important – from there, you can get the best management and treatment for your personal circumstances. Causes It is not fully understood what the causes of Meniere’s Disease are. There are many theories, but none have been widely accepted as the root cause of the condition. A build up of fluid in the inner ear, called “endolymph,” is often associated with creating a build-up of pressure in the ear, that...
Dare we look ahead to Spring?

Dare we look ahead to Spring?

With temperatures set to soar over the weekend and into next week, dare we risk getting excited for Spring? Every season comes with its own sounds and the challenges they bring and hearing loss in Spring is no different. It really only was a few weeks ago that we were warning you about snow, ice and hail. Hey, the weather never can make its mind up! Below are the sounds you can expect to hear this Spring. Birdsong The high frequencies are usually the first ones lost with hearing loss. That’s why those having trouble with their hearing will often have difficulty hearing children and female voices. That means hearing your grandchildren or the female members of your family, especially during family gatherings can be a challenge. With everyday sounds however, birdsong at Spring time is what you’re likely to miss especially if you’re an avid birdwatcher. Indeed, there are stories online of older birdwatchers seeing a Robin, a Teal or Duck but not being able to hear it sing. If you notice you don’t hear the birds sing anymore, that’s a sure sign you have a hearing loss. Cricket The cricket season may not yet have officially started but England have been playing in the West Indies recently. The season officially starts mid-April. But there are a few nice one day international game to see in March and April this year. Cricket comes with a range of challenges if you’re watching the match and you have a hearing loss in Spring. You have the bowler running up to deliver the ball, the ball bouncing off the ground, the...
Getting sick of the city noise?

Getting sick of the city noise?

A couple of weeks ago, I was awoken by the god awful noise of a jackhammer at 11pm just outside my window. Noise pollution can be serious stuff. It has been shown to increase stress, anxiety and even lead to depression. When you realise that chronic noise can stop you from sleeping, this shouldn’t really be surprising. Below are just a few ways you can use when soundproofing your home from the busy city outside. Triple Glazing Certainly the most expensive option here but definitely worth it if you can afford it. As the name suggests, triple glazing adds another pane of glass to your window. Solid walls are pretty good at keeping sound out but windows have always been a weak point at letting both heat and sound through. There is a big reduction in sound that can get through triple glazing compared to double glazing especially the older kind. Standard now in Scandinavia, it has the added bonus of cutting your heat loss during the winter by 75% compared to older double glazing. Soft Furnishings Sound dampening curtains are a cheaper alternative to triple glazing, though less effective of course. These are sometimes called blackout curtains and are usually made of thick sound absorbent materials. Ikea even have a handy guide for making your own at home using some materials. If that’s not enough, you can always try sound absorbent foam panels though you’ll have to find somewhere to put them. These are the jagged foam panels you usually see in sound studios. Even rugs, carpet and wall hangings could help soften the sounds coming from your...
Stop using plastic stemmed cotton buds!

Stop using plastic stemmed cotton buds!

Cotton buds are adding to our ever increasing plastic waste problem. Over the last year, there has been a lot of discussion about the amount of plastic waste that the world is producing with Theresa May even stating that plastic waste is “one of the greatest environmental challenges facing the world”. Unfortunately, cotton buds are adding to this problem. The BBC reported in 2018 that Scotland’s Environment Minister, Roseanna Cunningham, had announced a plan to ban plastic straws, following a similar move aimed at banning the sale and manufacture if of plastic-stemmed cotton buds. Whilst some of you may be heartbroken that somewhere in the future you may no longer be able to buy the little life saving devices to fix your false eyelashes or get rid of excess nail polish, we know that some of you will be disappointed that you won’t be able to clean your ears with cotton buds anymore. Here at Veritas Hearing, we welcome this news as we don’t like them anyway and here’s why… Earwax is good for your ears Earwax keeps your ears clean by trapping dust and dirt. As new wax is produced, it pushes the old wax out and the dust and dirt comes out with it. Jaw movement encourages the earwax to migrate outwards, thus cleaning the ears of anything that shouldn’t be in there. Earwax also provides protection against bacteria, fungi, insects and water. So if the idea of something crawling into your ear keeps you awake at night, be glad you have earwax to reduce the chances of it happening. Earwax reduces the chances of ear infections...

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