Belgian PM suffers hearing loss from gunshot – left with partial deafness and tinnitus

Belgian PM suffers hearing loss from gunshot – left with partial deafness and tinnitus

The Belgian prime minister, Charles Michel, had a nasty shock last week after he suffered a hearing loss from gunshot. The PM was attending what should have been a fairly uneventful opening for a 20km run in Brussels. Unfortunately, it appears he was standing just a little too close to Princess Astrid who fired a gun to mark the beginning of the race. Clearly Mr Michel was not aware a gunshot can be anywhere from 140-190 decibels depending on how close you are to the source. That’s anywhere from fireworks up close to a jet engine. The daughter of the king The PM appeared to grimace as the daughter of Philippe, the Belgian King, fired the shot on a Sunday. At first he laughed it off so as not to cause any embarrassment for the Royals. However, Mr Michel had his entire schedule cleared after a medical examination of his ears the day after. Ringing in the ears after an especially loud noise or event is quite common and a sign that permanent hearing loss has happened. His office gave a statement saying “The prime minister must follow a number of treatments within 48 hours after the incident”. They also said they expected him to receive more treatment for the rest of the week. His spokesman said Mr Michel was suffering from partial deafness and tinnitus. This shouldn’t be a surprise. It’s advised you give your hearing a rest for 24 hours after any very loud noises or events such as music concerts or festivals that leave any ringing in the ears. Had he been a bit more mindful...
Hearing loss, sports and summer: where to protect yourself in 2017

Hearing loss, sports and summer: where to protect yourself in 2017

Hearing loss, sports and summer are not words you usually hear in the same sentence but with Summer finally upon us, it’s time to get out and enjoy our favourites sports. If you’re lucky enough to be able to attend any sports events in person this Summer, be sure to protect your hearing. Below are three sports to look forward to over the coming months and also where you should where hearing protection like ear muffs or ear plugs. Football If you were lucky enough to be able to see Arsenal beat Chelsea to win the FA Cup then we hope you had proper hearing protection. There aren’t many sports with an atmosphere as electric as football but with that atmosphere comes a lot of ear damaging noise. England have an action-packed football season this summer playing Scotland for the World Cup qualifiers on Saturday 10th June and former world champions France on Tuesday 13th June. Just try and stay away from any vuvuzelas… Rugby The summer is going to have a lot of Rugby both this month and the next. England are playing Argentina next Saturday on the 10th June. The British and Irish Lions are playing New Zealand later this month and if that wasn’t enough, twice again in July. If you’re lucky enough to see any of these, expect not just big players but a big crowd too. Protecting your hearing certainly won’t stop England scoring that extra try and you’ll be able to preserve your hearing when it happens. Cricket Certainly not the first sport you think of when you think of loud sports but...
See the emotional moment couple hear for first time after 12 years of marriage

See the emotional moment couple hear for first time after 12 years of marriage

A deaf couple hear for the first time after 12 years of marriage a video by the University of Southampton shows. Both Helen and Neil Robinson have been deaf since birth after both their mothers contracted Rubella during pregnancy. The video shows the two having their cochlear implants turned on for the first time. Cochlear implants work by having electrodes inserted under the skull via surgery. The implants were provided by the Southampton University Audiology Implant Service (USAIS). They have fitted over a thousand hearing devices over the last 27 years. Neil and Helen were the first couple to ever use the service for cochlear implants. The surgery was carried out at Nuffield Health Wessex Hospital in Eastleigh, Hampshire by Ear, Nose and Throat surgeon Tim Mitchell. The couple live near Salisbury in Wiltshire and Neil is a proud Assistant Curate at Salisbury Cathedral. Cochlear implants Getting a cochlear implant can be a big decision as the surgery involves inserting electrodes directly into the brain. In this case, 16 electrodes were inserted into Helen and Neil’s brains. One part of the implants sits under the skull and the other sits outside the skull. The two are joined via a magnet. Helen spent two years trying to convince Neil to try the surgery with her. The emotion in the video is overwhelming for him as he’s immediately overcome while he tries to fight back tears. It goes on to show the couple getting used to their newfound sense of the world as the clinic helps them develop their hearing. Neil talks about hearing the birds sing for the first time....
How to tell if someone needs a hearing aid: 3 common signs

How to tell if someone needs a hearing aid: 3 common signs

It can sometimes be difficult to tell if someone needs a hearing aid. Those with hearing loss are often very good at covering up the problem. They will however, have very particular behaviours or coping mechanisms to hide or make up for their hearing problems. According to Action on Hearing Loss, people wait on average 10 years before seeking help for their hearing loss. Therefore, they can be using these coping mechanisms for years before something is done about it. If your spouse does the following, they are compensating for a hearing loss. They keep asking you to repeat yourself This would of course be the most obvious one. People with hearing loss tend to have trouble hearing speech and hearing aids are designed to improve speech. It is usually the higher frequencies that are lost first with hearing loss. That means your husband or wife may have the most difficulty with female voices and the grandchildren. You may also find that you have to pronounce your S’s and T’s with much more emphasis. You may also find they have much more difficulty communicating with others as you have adapted the way you speak to your partner to make up for their hearing loss. They can’t understand you unless you’re facing them The most common way of making up for a hearing loss is by reading lips and body language. In fact, your spouse may become very skilled at this. So much so that it might not even appear that they’re having problems hearing. The issue with this is that it requires a high level of concentration. Hence, it...
Introducing the new Unitron rechargeable hearing aid

Introducing the new Unitron rechargeable hearing aid

The launch of the new Unitron rechargeable hearing aid is due this month. The Unitron Moxi Fit R looks sleek and stylish. It also claims to be the smallest rechargeable hearing aid in the world. That’s leading on from their Unitron Moxi Now which is the smallest RIC hearing aid in the world. That’s not a bad track record. Looking for the most discreet rechargeable hearing aid you can buy? These are the least likely to get noticed by friends or family. The Unitron Moxi Fit R uses replaceable size 312 rechargeable batteries that can be recharged hundreds of times. A single charge will last you anywhere up to 24 hours. That’s more than enough to get you through the day, likely two. Use regular batteries too If however, you find yourself out for the day, your batteries run out of power and you don’t have a replacement rechargeable pair, you can just pop in some regular, disposable size 312 zinc-air batteries. The Unitron Moxi Fit R is the only rechargeable hearing aid that allows you to use both regular and rechargeable batteries. That’s a pretty hand feature if you want the most flexibility. The Moxi Fit R runs Unitron’s latest Tempus platform. It promises to increase sound quality, improve your understanding when listening to somebody talk and sense where sound is coming from and where you are in relation to it. It uses SoundCore which is made up of four main features which achieve this. That means you get a much more natural sense of sound than their previous North platform. If you’d like to have a free test...
Cotton ear buds and why it’s time to stop using them

Cotton ear buds and why it’s time to stop using them

Everyone knows what it’s like to get a cotton ear bud and jiggle it around inside your ear a bit. It can be strangely satisfying and feels like you’re scratching an itch that hasn’t been scratched in days. As if that wasn’t enough, you’re cleaning your ears. Surely nobody would say a thing if you were to take a cotton ear bud and stick it in your ear, right? Wrong. Doctors and Ear Nose and Throat specialists have been saying for years that you really shouldn’t be putting anything in your ears. Whether that’s a pencil, your keys, a toothpick or yes, a cotton bud. Earwax is good for your ears Earwax keeps your ears clean by trapping dust and dirt. As new wax is produced, it pushes the old wax out and the dust and dirt comes out with it. Jaw movement encourages the earwax to migrate outwards, thus cleaning the ears of anything that shouldn’t be in there. Earwax also provides protection against bacteria, fungi, insects and water. So if the idea of something crawling into your ear keeps you awake at night, be glad you have earwax to reduce the chances of it happening. Earwax reduces the chances of ear infections including bacterial and fungal infections with bacteria-killing properties. Cotton ear buds damage your ears and don’t clean them If that wasn’t enough of an argument in favour of letting the ear clean itself there’s more. Cotton ear buds increase the risk of infection by scratching the inner ear. This leaves broken skin is vulnerable to infections. Pushing a cotton ear bud into your ear can...

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